Bringing up sons tips

Tipping is commonly given to certain service sector workers for a service performed or anticipated, as opposed to money offered for a product or as part of a purchase price. Tips and their amount are a matter bringing up sons tips social custom and etiquette, and the custom varies between countries and settings. In some circumstances, such as with U.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word “tip” originated as a slang term and its etymology is unclear. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the meaning “give a small present of money” began around 1600, and the meaning “give a gratuity to” is first attested in 1706. The practice of tipping began in Tudor England. By the 17th century, it was expected that overnight guests to private homes would provide sums of money, known as vails, to the host’s servants.

Medieval Latin gratuitas, “free gift”, probably from earlier Latin gratuitus, “free, freely given” . The meaning “money given for favor or services” is first attested in the 1530s. In some languages, the term translates to “drink money” or similar: for example pourboire in French, Trinkgeld in German, drikkepenge in Danish, and napiwek in Polish. This comes from a custom of inviting a servant to drink a glass in honour of the guest, and paying for it, in order for the guests to show generosity among each other.

The term bibalia in Latin was recorded in 1372. The person who distributes monies from the tronc is known as the troncmaster. When a tronc exists in the UK, responsibility for deducting pay-as-you-earn taxes from the distribution may lie with the troncmaster rather than the employer. This map shows tipping customs at restaurants in different countries. In Nigeria tipping is not so common at upscale hotels and restaurants because service charge is usually included in the bill though the employees seldom get this as part of their wages.

In recent times however, the service provider usually coerce the customer for tips in a subtle manner. There have been reported cases of security guards asking bank customers for tips. In China, traditionally there is no tipping. However, hotels that routinely serve foreign tourists allow tipping. An example would be tour guides and associated drivers. Taxi drivers in Hong Kong may also charge the difference between a fare and a round sum as a “courtesy fee” to avoid making change for larger bills.