31.05.2018

Children having deviations in development

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The reports were shared at the World Health Assembly. 6-7 November 2014 – Close to 100 high level representatives from governments, civil society, and international organizations have gathered in Geneva for two days to reaffirm their children having deviations in development to accelerating progress towards women’s and children’s health in the lead up to and in the post-2015 era, and to discuss how to ensure that accountability remains at the centre of this agenda.

Governments of Canada and Norway, is the last one of a number of high- level meetings convened by various key partners in 2014, all part of a larger strategic process aimed at bringing together stakeholders in women’s and children’s health to keep the momentum going and set the agenda as we approach the MDGs. MDGs 4 and 5, aimed at reducing child and maternal deaths and improving maternal health, are lagging behind. We should judge the progress in humanity and the progress of any society or country by the way they treat their women and children. They have been lagging behind in the last 20 to 30 years of development.

We should give them special attention. Dr Flavia Bustreo about the need to further accelerate progress. Country assessments and roadmaps for accountability for health. Assessments drafted during accountability workshops, based on the Country Accountability Framework assessment and planning tool, and roadmaps reviewed and validated through a broad consultation with the major stakeholders in-country.

The X and Y chromosomes determine a person’s sex. Most women are 46XX and most men are 46XY. The biological differences between men and women result from two processes: sex determination and differentiation. The biological process of sex determination controls whether the male or female sexual differentiation pathway will be followed.

Gender, typically described in terms of masculinity and femininity, is a social construction that varies across different cultures and over time. There are a number of cultures, for example, in which greater gender diversity exists and sex and gender are not always neatly divided along binary lines such as male and female or homosexual and heterosexual. In 1959, chromosomal analysis of two human disorders, Turner syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome, demonstrated for the first time that genetic factors on the Y chromosomes of mammals are important determinants in male sex. The sex determining region on the Y chromosome, referred to as the SRY, has a fundamental role in sex determination and is believed to be the switch that initiates testis development. These practices, however, are misnomers as they actually refer to biological sex and not gender.