Statutory guidance for schools and colleges on safeguarding children and safer recruitment. It sets out the legal duties you must follow to safeguard and promote documents regulating pre-school education welfare of children and young people under the age of 18 in schools and colleges.

All school and college staff should read part 1 of this guidance. Part 1 of the guidance is also available as a standalone document. Regulated activity in relation to children: scope’ describes work that a barred person must not do. Disqualification under the Childcare Act 2006’. Statutory guidance sets out what schools must do to comply with the law. You should follow the guidance unless you have a very good reason not to.

5 September 2016 Updated ‘Keeping children safe in education’. 26 May 2016 Added ‘Keeping children safe in education: for schools and colleges – guidance from 5 September 2016’. 12 May 2016 Added ‘Regulated activity in relation to children: scope’ document. 22 July 2015 Both documents updated to reflect the new prevent duty, to emphasise responsibilities concerning children missing from education, and to provide more content on female genital mutilation. 18 June 2015 In ‘Regulated activity’ section, corrected the link to the factual note on regulated activity in relation to children. Is there anything wrong with this page? All content is available under the Open Government Licence v3.

The right to education also includes a responsibility to provide basic education for individuals who have not completed primary education. In addition to these access to education provisions, the right to education encompasses the obligation to avoid discrimination at all levels of the educational system, to set minimum standards and to improve the quality of education. The right to education is reflected in international law in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Articles 13 and 14 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Everyone has the right to education.

Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. In Europe, Article 2 of the first Protocol of 20 March 1952 to the European Convention on Human Rights states that the right to education is recognized as a human right and is understood to establish an entitlement to education.