26.04.2018

Drawing horses for kids

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Completing the CAPTCHA proves you are a human and gives you temporary access to the web property. What can I do to prevent this in the future? If you are on a personal connection, like at home, you can run an anti-virus scan on your device to make sure it is not infected with malware. If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices. Another way to prevent getting this page in the future is to use Privacy Pass. Check out the browser extension in the Firefox Add-ons Store. Barbie is the best-selling fashion doll ever sold.

Barbie’s true name is Barbara Millicent Roberts, her signature color is pink, and she is from a fictional city in Wisconsin called Willows, Wisconsin. Spectacles for horses, a bicycle railway and a steam-powered man that can pull carts filled with people. These are just some of the wacky inventions that were designed by innovative Victorians looking to make the next big technological breakthrough. They are documented in a series of black-and-white illustrations that were uncovered by Caroline Rochford, an author and family historian from Wakefield, West Yorkshire.

Bizarre breakthroughs: The steam man, left, was invented by a¬†Canadian professor in 1893 to pull wagons filled with people. Those using the bicycle railway, pictured, pedaled on an inverted bike that rode along a single track on top of a wooden fence. Mrs Rochford came across the images in a collection of rare magazines from the late 1880s while carrying out research for the¬†genealogy company she runs with her husband, Michael. She said: ‘The volume was packed with articles about everyday life in Victorian times, and as soon as I saw the illustrations of the latest inventions of the day, I was hooked.