30.05.2018

Preparing children for school assignments to read and write

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Preparing children for school assignments to read and write what skills your child should have at the beginning — and by the end — of the school year. Kindergarten is an exciting time of exploration for your child. As her motor coordination increases, so too will her sense of independence, self-reliance, and self-confidence. You may want to review this list and see if there is anything else you would like to teach your child before those first days of school.

Don’t panic if your child hasn’t nailed everything on the list — she’ll learn a lot in kindergarten. What’s more important is to wean her from relying on you to do things she could do herself, such as zipping her jacket or tying her shoes. Give her the chance to show you what she can do — you might be in for a few surprises! Although the curriculum may vary from school to school, general goals focus on children building strong pre-reading skills, practicing letter formation, enhancing listening and communication skills, getting an introduction to basic math concepts, and acquiring an active interest in the world. Get kids learning with these fun, themed activities!

Nutritious breakfast and snack recipes—with food activities for kids! Reinforce your child’s time telling skills with this award-winning mobile app! Get expert advice on reading, homework help, learning activities, and more. Review general curricula for first grade, what to expect for each subject, and activities that can be done at home to support learning in the classroom. In many ways, 1st grade is a year of important transitions—children leave behind much of the play of preschool and kindergarten and dive into developing deeper academic skills.

1st graders progress from having beginner reading and writing skills to becoming beginning readers and writers, as they not only read and write more often, but with greater comprehension and ability, too. First grade is a crucial year for building reading skills. In 1st grade, students begin to define themselves with respect to what kind of readers they are. While this is already being done in the classroom, it can certainly be done at home too. In 1st grade, there is also a change in the classroom structure from that of preschool and kindergarten.

The 1st grade classroom is usually organized more like a traditional elementary school classroom, with tables and desks at which students spend more of their time. However, in most classrooms there is still a meeting area for lessons and class discussions, as well as areas or centers dedicated to different subjects of learning. Keep in mind that your child will need to adjust to this new learning environment. He may get tired at the end of the day or have trouble focusing as the day progresses. It is important to check with your child’s teacher on your child’s progress and work together to develop strategies if your child is having trouble adjusting, especially at the beginning of the year.