29.07.2018

Self-education sensory education of children of early age

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Please forward this error screen to 64. Aspergers at all, they are simply “gifted. However, there are a many aspects self-education sensory education of children of early age giftedness that create unique challenges. Because of their finely tuned awareness, gifted kids tend to experience life differently and more intensely than others.

Unfortunately, peers and adults at school or home often do not understand these differences. In a clinical situation, the youngster’s intense personal traits and difficulties may be viewed as symptoms of a mental or emotional disorder. Misguided therapy or medication may follow, as the clinician attempts to suppress or “cure” the symptoms of giftedness. Aspergers— Highly gifted kids often have different ways of interacting socially. Their unusual comments and jokes may be misinterpreted as signs of Aspergers.

Children with Aspergers may be gifted—especially in certain specific skills—but they do not respond as well as neurotypical kids to ordinary social or emotional cues. They may not make friends readily and often prefer to keep to themselves. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder— Traits such as intensity, impatience, sensitivity, and high energy are common in kids with ADHD , as well as in gifted kids. Some gifted kids do have ADHD, but many do not. They are at a different developmental level than other kids. As a result, they may be inattentive and impulsive in certain situations.

Mood Disorders— Gifted kids may have intense mood swings. They notice inconsistencies and absurdities in society and in the people around them. They can feel different and alienated from others. These traits are often found in kids with depression, especially those with bipolar disorder. A gifted child who has mood swings, irritability, difficulties with anger control, etc. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder— Gifted kids like to organize things into complex structures.

They tend to be perfectionists and idealists. They can get upset when others do not go along with their ideas, appearing intolerant and “bossy. This behavior may be mistaken for obsessive-compulsive disorder or obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Oppositional Defiant Disorder— Like kids with oppositional defiant disorder , gifted kids frequently appear “strong-willed. However, such behavior is often due to their intensity, sensitivity, and idealism. They do not like to be criticized for their different way of thinking. They may question the rules and engage in power struggles with authority figures.

Sleep Disorders— Nightmare disorder, sleep terror disorder, and sleepwalking disorder appear to be more common in gifted kids. Some gifted kids sleep a lot less than other kids. In the presence of unusual sleep patterns, your family doctor can advise whether a gifted youngster needs further evaluation for sleep or psychological problems. Relational Problems— Moms and dads may lack information about the traits of gifted kids. Such kids may appear to be willful, mischievous, or strange.

They may be criticized or disciplined for behaviors that stem from curiosity, intensity, and sensitivity. Power struggles, tantrums, and other behavior problems may surface. Effective therapy should involve helping the family understand and cope with the youngster’s intensity. Gifted kids may develop a poor self-image when learning disabilities are present.

They tend to dwell on the things they can’t do and may need help in developing a good self-image. Gifted kids have many strengths and possess greater than average awareness, perception, and sensitivity. Strengths: Acquires and retains information quickly. Possible Problems: Difficulty accepting the illogical-such as feelings, traditions, or matters to be taken on faith.

Strengths: Love of truth, equity, and fair play. Gifted and talented kids often must overcome many challenges to reach their potential. They frequently need help interacting in the mainstream world, finding supportive environments, and channeling their skills. When gifted kids are misdiagnosed and wrongly stigmatized, they cannot get the type of support they need. Families, teachers, and health professionals need to be better educated about the social and emotional needs of gifted kids. I have a 16 year old son who has Asperger Syndrome. He has also tested in the 99th percentile for intelligence.