30.07.2018

Teach kids how to draw

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This time it’s a homeschooling faith vs reason question I received on the Catholic All Year Facebook page from reader Karen. We are new to homeschooling and teach kids how to draw your blog! We are starting our journey through the history of the world . I continue to struggle with how to teach creation in align with our Catholic faith.

How old do we believe the world is? Do we think that creation really was over seven 24 hour days? Hey Karen, I went through this EXACT SAME THING when I first started homeschooling my oldest son. He’s really into science, so it came up early. I didn’t know the Catholic teaching about creation either, I just had this vague sense that “Christians think evolution is bad. When I did finally look into it, it made me so proud of our rich Catholic faith that loves both faith and reason, both religion and science. Protestant Christians have painted themselves into a corner with the sola scriptura thing and can’t believe anything that isn’t literally in the Bible.

That’s not how we view it. We view the Bible as, not a book, but a whole library, full of different genres, some of which are meant to be taken literally, and some of which are not. So we Catholics have the freedom and confidence to follow scientific exploration wherever it leads us. We aren’t scared of science because we know that good science is the pursuit of truth and ALL truth leads to God. So, what does that mean for kindergartners? Well, mostly, that Adam and Eve were real people created by God, and that we are all descended from them.

God made all creatures and all creation, but we don’t know exactly how, or on exactly what timeline. It’s possible that it happened exactly how it is in Genesis, but that doesn’t look like the most likely explanation now. And we are truth seekers, so we want to know the truth and that will point to God. It looks like there has been evolution, at least on a small scale, and that just means that was God’s plan, and how he decided to make things work.