Types and methods of work with children

47 0 0 0 13 6. Can an IUD affect your chances of having children types and methods of work with children the future? Is the female condom as effective as its male counterpart?

Here are 12 of the most common birth control methods, and why you should or shouldn’t try them. It’s also known for easing hot flashes and restoring regular periods. Who should avoid it: Smokers and those 35 or older. The estrogen may cause dangerous blood clots. If you suffer from migraines, you should also pass because it may trigger the painful headaches. What it does: Known as the mini pill, progestin-only meds don’t contain estrogen.

They’re safer for smokers, diabetics, and heart disease patients, as well as those at risk for blood clots. They also won’t reduce the milk supply for women who are breast-feeding. Who should avoid it: If you have trouble remembering to take your pill at the same time every day, progestin-only pills might not be your best bet. What it does: These pills prevent pregnancy and allow you to have a period only every three months. Note: Lybrel stops your period for a year, but you must take a pill every day, year-round.

Who should avoid it: There’s no evidence proving it’s dangerous not to have periods, but there is still no long-term research to show that it is safe. What it does: The ring is made of flexible plastic and delivers estrogen and progestin, just like the combination pill. You place the ring in your vagina for three weeks, and then remove it for one week so that you have a regular period. What it does: Made of rubber and shaped like a dome, a diaphragm prevents sperm from fertilizing an egg. It covers the cervix and must always be used with a spermicide. Women must be fitted for a diaphragm in their doctor’s office.

Who should avoid it: If your weight tends to fluctuate by more than 10 pounds at a time, the diaphragm may not work. If you gain or lose weight, you’ll need to be refitted. You might want to consider another option. If you’ve had toxic shock syndrome, you shouldn’t use a diaphragm. Mirena, also surgically implanted, works by releasing hormones. Who should avoid it: Some doctors recommend the device only for women who have given birth.

When the device is implanted, your uterus is expanded, and this might cause pain in women who have not had children. If you’re planning on having children in a year or two, look at other options. 500—might not be worth it for short-term use. What it does: The female condom is made of polyurethane, or soft plastic, and protects against STDs. It is inserted deep into the vagina, over the cervix, much like a diaphragm.

Unlike the male condom, the female condom can be put into place up to eight hours before sex. Who should avoid it: Male condoms offer more protection—both against STDs and pregnancy—than female condoms, so if you and your male partner aren’t in a long-term, monogamous relationship, female condoms are not a perfect substitute. What it does: Male condoms protect against pregnancy and STDs, including HIV. Worn properly, condoms prevent sperm from entering the uterus. Who should avoid it: If your mate is allergic to latex or polyurethane, you’ll have to find another option. And if you tend to use a lubricant that contains oil, such as hand lotion or baby oil, you’ll need to switch to an oil-free option like K-Y Jelly, which, unlike oil-based lubricants, doesn’t degrade latex.